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Looking for a last-second gift idea or tip for Valentine’s Day? BradsDeals.com’s Rebecca Lehmann offered up a handful on the show Friday night.

A secret is safe with Long Island’s Hoodie Allen. Just ask his friend, Ed Sheeran.

“I knew for a little bit. I had to keep my mouth shut,” Allen said regarding Sheeran’s recent engagement to longtime girlfriend Cherry Seaborn. “I did a good job too; I think I passed the test of just zipping it up and not letting anyone know.”

There was no pun intended on Hoodie’s zipper comment, nor on his adjective use when describing the couple.

“It wasn’t that much of a shock because they’re perfect together,” the emcee, born Steven Markowitz, said. “I love them both so I was really happy.”

I ran in to Allen on the red carpet of The GRAMMYs outside of Madison Square Garden in Manhattan. The hip-hop artist, who was there alongside girlfriend Sadie Newman, took over Bulova’s Instagram Story for the award show weekend. Bulova is the official timepiece partner of The GRAMMY Awards; it was Allen’s first time attending the event.

“Overwhelming,” he responded when I asked what he thought of spectacle that is a GRAMMYs red carpet. “I don’t know (because) if it’s just cold out or the adrenaline but yeah, this is pretty cool.”

As for what is currently on the artist’s plate, he just wrapped a world tour in December and is currently working on his next mixtape. Allen noted that he’s been bouncing between the road and the studio so there could be both new music and concert dates in store for his fans this year.

So, what happens to all of the championship merchandise printed for the team that doesn’t win the big game? That’s where Good360, a non-profit based in Virginia, steps in. The organization’s CMO, Shari Rudolph, explained its partnership with the NFL to give those shirts, sweatshirts and hats to countries outside the U.S. that need clothing. Rudolph also talked about working with MLB for its World Series and the production differences between the two leagues.

Believe it or not, one of the more inspirational moments I experienced on The GRAMMYs red carpet involved interviewing Danny Gokey. You may remember the singer as the third finalist on the eighth season of “American Idol.” After an introduction so vast on a show so popular, it usually becomes difficult for artists to be known for anything other than appearing on the TV competition. That usually leads the contestants to either embrace it or spend the rest of their career attempting to erase it.

Gokey took a path less traveled: a career-reinvention of sorts. However his goal was far deeper than shedding a label or scoring a hit record.

“I got to create from what was on the inside of me at the beginning,” Gokey, standing alongside his wife Leyicet, told me. “What I tried to do was create an impact.

“We’re all created uniquely. I know a lot of times we deal with insecurities like, ‘Oh man, that person is getting a lot more looks than I am,’ but really people have to think, ‘No, what you do – no one else can do.’”

Gokey further explained that by people not conforming to others’ standards and staying true to themselves, they will be able to travel to places never imagined. And for the singer, that place was The 60th GRAMMYs, earning his first career nomination in the Best Contemporary Christian Music category for his album, “Rise.” Gokey attributes the album’s success to his record label, BMG, affording him the freedom to practice what he preached. It serves as yet another example that the most impactful art is the most honest.

Fresh off rehearsing on The GRAMMYs stage, Bebe Rexha dropped a rather unsurprising yet noteworthy tidbit: her mom and Jimmy Fallon are basically BFFs.

“He’s actually cool with my mom,” the songstress replied when I asked her if she had any face time with Fallon following her performance of “Meant To Be” on “The Tonight Show.” “They were in the dressing room for like 30 minutes, my whole team was in there, but I had to run and go listen to the mix and I was like, ‘I don’t know what they’re doing.’ It was funny.

“I feel proud of that song,” Rexha added regarding the performance featuring Florida Georgia Line, “so every time I can perform it, it’s like a moment.”

The Brooklyn-born artist reiterated that the song is a departure both for her and for pop music at the moment. It inspired Rexha’s transition to a new project called “Expectations,” which she still plans to release this year.

But this past weekend, she was at home, getting ready to attend and perform at her first GRAMMYs.

“I’m like, ‘What? The GRAMMYs are in New York? Yas!’” she exclaimed. “I’m talking to Cyndi Lauper and she’s like (mimics New York accent), ‘Yeah, yunno, I gotta put my in-ears in, I gotta do all this,’ and I’m like, ‘Yes! I feel like I belong now,’ because people usually make fun of my accent.”

Rexha joined Lauper, Camila Cabello, Julia Michaels and Andra Day in supporting Kesha’s performance of “Praying” at The 60th GRAMMYs on Sunday, in what was the most poignant moment of the show.

When singer/songwriter Max created “Lights Down Low,” he wrote the song for his now wife, Emily. Max eventually proposed to her with the song before releasing it as a single. The track is now platinum and cracked the top 10 this week at pop radio. Of course it’s significant on a lot of levels to the artist, but what has its success meant to his wife?

“It’s so insane,” Emily told me after her husband performed at Hackensack Meridian Health Stage 17 as a part of GRAMMY Week. “It’s coming up on 3 years now when I got first sent the original file. Listening to it in my bed, under my covers by myself, to now we’ve traveled the world because of the song together and met so many amazing people, shared so many amazing stories… it’s insane. I never imagined this life.”

“If a song doesn’t mean this much to me, I wouldn’t want it to be this heard,” Max added. “In that way, it’s been very healthy because yunno it’s like, ‘Oh well, maybe somebody should write your new single,’ or something like that and it makes me realize: no. It has to come from my heart because I can’t imagine spending my entire life, every day talking about a song that isn’t something that means so much to me.”

So as the song continues to climb up the chart, Max, nee Schneider, is embracing the pressure of a follow-up as he continues work on his sophomore album. The artist entered a rare stretch during GRAMMY Weekend where he was actually able to hang out at home in New York for a few days – catching up with family, hitting up the studio and even stopping by The Garden to watch his beloved Knicks.

For Walk The Moon lead singer Nick Petricca, the band’s new album and current tour have provided him with a New Year’s Resolution for 2018: letting go of fear.

“I feel like when I see my favorite artists on stage, I’m just like, ‘Wow, they just go out there and are hiding nothing,’” he explained to me over the weekend. “They seem fearless. And it’s interesting, ‘One Foot’ in front of the other has become this song that we’ve been kind of like forced to practice what we preach.

“You can’t really think twice,” Petricca continued. “You can’t be up (on stage) judging yourself the whole time or else the thing kind of crumbles.”

The aforementioned “One Foot” is a perfect example of this new era within’ the Cincinnati-based quartet: a catchy, infectious up-tempo sing-a-long that still contains some gravitas and vulnerability. Walk The Moon’s third LP, “What If Nothing,” is the group’s most vulnerable to date: so much so that another benefit arose as the band created the “Press Restart Tour.”

“We can put a little more of an emotional curve in to the set,” guitarist Eli Maiman noted. “I think prior to now, we had a disproportionate amount of songs that were kind of, ‘up.’ The set at this point is very contoured in terms of its emotional impact.”

A quick look back to Walk The Moon’s recent history reveals how this happened: following the worldwide hit “Shut Up And Dance” and the subsequent trek supporting the album “Talking Is Hard,” the band took a break… almost, for good. That changed at bassist Kevin Ray’s wedding; the first time since the hiatus that all four members were together. Shortly thereafter, the group re-entered the studio and began working on what would eventually be “What If Nothing.”

Petricca believes the band is hungrier than ever, and part of that may be attributed to what they learned about each other during their time off.

“We all are respecting our own humanity on a different level,” the front man admitted. “I think we’re seeing the ways that it serves the music as well; not just burning all of the candles at all of the ends and playing as many shows as possible but also just making sure that we are 100% for the listeners and for our fans.”

I caught up with three-fourths of Walk The Moon before soundcheck at Mohegan Sun Arena in Uncasville, Connecticut on Saturday; drummer Sean Waugaman was napping and understandably so. The guys just landed that morning from a red-eye flight after performing a radio show in Los Angeles the night prior. A full schedule of promo followed soundcheck; the band then took the stage around 9:10 pm.

And yet despite all of that, the quartet sounded fantastic Saturday night. It was if once on stage, they were fearless.

Attorney Jill Stanley, PROOFWithJillStanley.com, called in to chat about the latest sexual impropriety allegations around Aziz Ansari and the sexual battery allegations levied against Seal.

Reading a President Trump tweet about Adam Levine recalled a few of my conversations with the Maroon 5 lead singer (whom Trump was not referring to; the President was quoting a columnist with media outlet The Federalist). I believe my first interview with Levine was in the fall of 2008; the artist was in Mexico and in between album cycles yet called in to stump for then-Senator Obama. We made small talk over the Maroon 5’s forthcoming album (“Hands All Over”) and a Halloween party Levine had thrown a few nights prior. Then, we dove in to heavier topics such as the economy as it relates to the music industry and the general election.

I chatted with Levine again in October of 2012, as President Obama ran for reelection against Mitt Romney. Reminding the front man of our interview four years prior, I asked Levine if he would again join the political fray to support the 44th President.

“I’m going to do whatever the hell I can, because if (Obama) doesn’t get elected I’m f—–g moving,” Levine responded. “I’d rather you be president than f—–g Mitt Romney, and I barely know you!”

Of course four years later, other public figures would make a similar claim (and actually be tested on how serious they were) about a Trump presidency. As for Levine, he’s keeping busy with “The Voice” and his band. Maroon 5 just released a new music video for the single, “Wait.” The group will tour behind its latest album, “Red Pill Blues” from May to June and then again from September to October.

I recently bore witness to a rather unique interaction: one of my favorite bands, Walk The Moon chatting and exchanging numbers with Diane Warren, who is a legendary songwriter. The guys from WTM were leaving my broadcast booth and thankfully, Warren was on her way in. I immediately wanted to know what they all chatted about.

“They were in the audience at the ASCAP Awards; I got a big award that night,” Warren recalled, later revealing that she might collaborate with the band. “Snoop gave (the award) to me, and I had worked with Snoop the year before. We were just joking that he had this giant blunt in his hand and I’m like, ‘Who has a match?’”

There is little if nothing that Warren, whose discography of penned tracks dates back to 1979, hasn’t seen or experienced. But if there has been one constant throughout her storied career, it is her approach to songwriting.

“I always went with my heart,” Warren insisted while noting that this very mindset led her to write “Stand Up For Something,” a song that Andra Day and Common performed for the movie, “Marshall.” She is proud of the final product and rightfully so; the track is up for Best Song Written For Visual Media at this year’s GRAMMYs. It is the eleventh time Warren has received a nomination in this category; she won the GRAMMY for it in 1997 thanks to Celine Dion’s “Because You Loved Me” from the 1996 film, “Up Close & Personal.”