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Mike Posner really did take a pill in Ibiza with the intention of showing superstar DJ Avicii that he was cool.

“One-hundred percent autobiographical,” the “Cooler Than Me” singer responded when I asked how true the song was. “(Avicii) didn’t take (a pill), but I took one to be cool.”

SeeB, a Norwegian production duo, remixed Posner’s version of “I Took A Pill In Ibiza” and now it is rocketing up the airplay charts. The remix cracked the top 20 on pop radio last week.

Coincidentally, it was a remix that first launched the Duke University alumnus’ career on to the airwaves. Minneapolis-based producer Gigamesh reworked Posner’s original rendition of “Cooler Than Me” to the version that we came to know and love in the summer of 2010.
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Almost six years later, Posner is back on the airwaves. He’s under a new record label (Island) and has not only Avicii, but a country music star to thank for his latest success.

“I was in the studio with my friend Jake Owen,” Posner recalled. “I played him a different song and he goes, ‘What inspired that tune?’”

Posner replied that he “made it up.” Owen paused for a moment and then offered up a serious question.

“(Owen) looked at me and he goes, ‘Why don’t you just tell the truth?’”

That night, Posner hopped aboard a plane and wrote “I Took A Pill In Ibiza.” It makes perfect sense that it all happened in the air; the song will probably serve as the lead single for Posner’s full-length follow-up to his 2010 debut titled, “31 Minutes to Takeoff.”

Coldplay released its seventh studio album, A Head Full Of Dreams, last Friday. The follow-up to 2014’s Ghost Stories sounds far more energetic from the outset thanks to the lead single, “Adventure of a Lifetime.” That’s not a coincidence; lead singer Chris Martin told me the album is reflective of the band’s current temperament.

“It’s really the sound of us being comfortable with being in Coldplay, if that makes any sense,” Martin explained. “We’re very grateful to be here and we’re not really worried now about… I get it that our music isn’t for everybody and I think once we let that go, it’s very liberating and so we feel free to be the band we really dreamed of being.”

Any artist needs to feel comfortable in his or her own skin, so perhaps it makes more sense that Coldplay didn’t tour behind the last album, opting instead to begin work immediately on new material.
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“There’s a real hunger in the band, and a real fire to get going,” Martin revealed. “For some reason, the album we just made is feeling really fun to play in rehearsal and it makes sense with some of the older songs too.

“I’d say the set list will be sort of, colorful, and so will the look of the whole thing.”

As of press time, U.S. dates for the band’s forthcoming tour have not been released. Coldplay shows in Europe are on sale and some South American concerts have also been announced.

“I was watching a band called The Flaming Lips in 1999, and Wayne (Coyne) was speaking to the audience like we were his friend,” Martin recalled when I asked him about the rapport he develops with the crowds that Coldplay performs for. “And I’d never seen anybody do that before. I’d always sort of felt like you had to be detached somehow or pretend you were on a slightly higher level – which works for some people, great. But for me, it doesn’t work.”

Coyne later instilled in Martin the confidence to simply speak on stage as he normally would to anyone else. Self-admittedly it sounds “clumsy and awkward” at times, but always authentic.

As for the album that the quartet will support on the road, it features a number of collaborations. Coldplay enlisted the help of Beyonce, Tove Lo, Noel Gallegher and Merry Clayton for different tracks. Avicii, the superstar DJ who produced “A Sky Full Of Stars,” for the band returns and assists with “Hymn For The Weekend,” the song that Knowles sings on.

But perhaps most meaningful for Martin is the feature at the end of “Adventure,” – a number of people were in the studio yelling “Woo-hoo!” at song’s conclusion, including his children Apple and Moses.

“I know that we had to get permission from their parents,” he joked about the kids’ involvement. “Luckily, we are their parents!”

Aloe Blacc recorded the acoustic version of “Wake Me Up!” inside Mike Einziger’s home studio with Avicii. The Incubus guitarist and superstar DJ, nee Tim Bergling, mixed it in to one of 2013’s biggest hits.

“I think Avicii is an incredible producer, and he knew at least a little bit of what he wanted to do,” Blacc told “The Ralphie Show” recently. “I went in to record a song written by Mac Davis for Avicii, and that’s when we first met. Mike Shinoda of Linkin Park suggested to Avicii, ‘You should get Aloe to sing this song.’”

Blacc admitted that he and Shinoda were far from great friends; the two know each other through a mutual friend.

The “I Need A Dollar” singer characterized the song he recorded as country-esque. Given the context that Davis was involved, it makes even more sense. But Avicii is mixing both genres and beats with his releases. The second single from the DJ’s album True could be considered even more country: “Hey Brother.”

“To see what Avicii is doing makes perfect sense to me,” Blacc, who cited his indie, multi-genre days as the reason why he understands the producer’s approach. “He’s melding worlds of really good songwriting, and really popular production. He’s going to hit a home run every time.”

Blacc released a Wake Me Up EP this past year. He is preparing his full-length album, Lift Your Spirit. The LP will include production contributions from Pharrell Williams and Rock Mafia.

Perhaps the biggest battle that artist management and record labels face with their acts is over the control of content. In addition to the creativity behind the music itself, suits and singers are seemingly at constant war over how things look and when they are to look that way. Labels adapting business models to the new era of music consumption only added fuel to the fire. With slumping sales and shrinking staffs, upper management is more concerned with profits and less concerned with taking chances or allowing artists the ability to take changes that could negatively affect said profits.

Enter superstar DJ Avicii, who is really not bound to any single entity period, other than himself. The electronic dance music creator could easily micromanage his career from the type of music he produces to the venues he plays to the media he partakes in.

But in an interview earlier this year with “The Ralphie Show,” the “Wake Me Up!” star said that he is only concerned with his first love: making music.

“It’s not really me; that’s more my management and my manager and stuff like that,” the DJ, born Tim Bergling, responded when I asked him about decisions like picking radio singles and clearing songs for commercials. “My fascination and what I’ve always loved doing is music and touring and that aspect of it. Me being able to focus on that and leaving the business side of things to my manager and label has helped me out a lot.”

The formula has worked for Avicii thus far: While he toured American arenas following the success of “Levels,” the producer was still able to do so without charting a big pop radio hit like some of his counterparts. However with “Wake Me Up!” the first single from his album True, Bergling now has one of those feats accomplished as well.

Dubstep. Coming to a radio near you a lot sooner than you think.

Super DJ/producer Avicii teams up with Australian duo Nervo for an instant club smash. Throw it on the pre-game playlist!

Yes, I understand this is basically the instrumental of Flo Rida’s “Good Feeling.”