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Pete Holmes is out to showcase a trait of the comedy world that few outsiders ever experience: compassion.

“I think we’re seeing a little bit of the true side of comedians which is that we are, under whatever gruff exterior there is, pretty sweet people,” Holmes told me in an interview for DISH Network’s DISH Studio to promote season two of his HBO series, “Crashing,” which he co-created and stars in. Holmes quickly added, “That’s not everybody. I’m not crazy. Every group has different types.”

But through this show, which is loosely based around Holmes’ real life, he aims to demonstrate how “this unlikely community shows love in unlikely ways.”

“In my experience, people are rooting for their friends, they band together and they care about each other,” he continued. “And, if that’s not your experience and you’re watching this, maybe get new friends. I mean, that’s not bad advice.”

And ironically enough, while Holmes advises against surrounding yourself with less toxic people, the person most prevalent in his life on-camera for the first two seasons is comedian Artie Lange.

“You might have an idea of Artie, like ‘He probably just cares about himself,’ and ‘He’s just a comedian and they just care about money or success.’

“I have experienced many times in my life, with Sarah (Silverman) in real life, with Artie on the show, is that these people can open up to you. And I love sharing that secret.”

Season two of “Crashing” is currently on HBO, with new episodes airing every Sunday night.

Many people have asked me since seeing the Instagram I posted on Tuesday and the answer is: she is everything you want her to be and more; a very pleasant and gracious human being.

In a departure from interviewing music artists, I sat across from actress Sarah Jessica Parker in HBO’s New York headquarters for a junket-style interview. She was promoting the second season of her series, “Divorce.” Our chat was filmed for DISH Studio on DISH Network and will air at a later date.

SJP is without question one of the more prominent actors I’ve interviewed and this was certainly something on my mind as I prepared (mostly by binging season one; by the way, the show is really good and surprisingly laugh-out-loud funny at times). I ultimately always remind myself that I’m not a rookie, that we all put our pants on the same way and that I’ll rise to the occasion.

Any trepidation that lingered after the pep talk immediately melted away after watching Parker enter our room. The Emmy winner was a sphere of energy, smiling and shaking hands with employees of HBO and the production company handling the junket, regardless of if she had previously met them or not.

I asked her about this to start our interview; I mean, just Sunday SJP was in Los Angeles for the Golden Globes. She flies back to snowy and cold New York, she has a family to take care of and she has to return to HBO for a press run about this series. I asked if it was OK to assume that she clearly must love the show.

While she obliged, Parker also noted that it is a little more than just a passion project: any time she comes back to HBO headquarters, it feels like home. She has so much history here, so many good memories, many of which come flooding back.

Parker looked and sounded genuinely grateful. She wasn’t bitter about her travel schedule, her obligations or any notion that her past should be shunned (some entertainers shy away from talking about previous work that was successful for fear that they’ll never be able to move past it).

But not SJP; she was thankful for her past and happy with her present. I myself felt fortunate to witness it because her gratitude was infectious; a nice lesson as we begin the year anew.

The Yankees’ home opener is Monday and if any unicorns, sharks, dinosaurs or Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles end up sitting behind home plate, don’t blame John Oliver.

“I think we’re probably banned,” the “Last Week Tonight” host cracked when I asked him if he’d be attending a game this year. Oliver chatted with me before performing at The Garden Of Laughs stand-up comedy concert, benefiting Madison Square Garden’s The Garden Of Dreams Foundation. Last season, Oliver ran a contest that sent costumed fans in to the prestigious Legends Seats in Yankee Stadium following comments by Yankees COO Lonn Trost. While attempting to explain the policies regarding price floors and print-at-home tickets, Trost said that those who typically sit in expensive seats would be frustrated by fans who don’t normally sit in a premium location.

Oliver dedicated an entire segment to Trost’s words on his show, lambasting both he and the Yankees for the perceived “holier-than-thou” practice. Then with the hashtag “#IHaveNeverSatInAPremiumLocation,”the HBO host gave away pairs of Legends Seats for a quarter with the only condition bring that you had to wear something out-of-the-ordinary to the game.

Following the final game of fans dressing up and chowing down on five-star cuisine from the stadium’s finest seats, the Yankees ran a message on the scoreboard: “Thanks, John Oliver. Everyone is welcome at Yankee Stadium.”

I brought this to the comedian’s attention.

“Oh yeah. Sure they did,” he responded. “The Yankees say a lot of things on the JumboTron they don’t mean, like ‘Great to have you, A-Rod.’”

Last Thursday night I was texting with my friend Quinn who was in town from Nashville for a work event. We scratched tentative plans to meet-up that evening, opting for the following day. After finding out what hotel she was staying in I offered to make Brunch reservations.

She liked the idea but also suggested that she was down to perhaps sightsee, something that I have done a terrible job of in my three-plus years in the city.

That’s when I got the idea that we should check out the observatory at One World Trade Center in the Financial District. Quinn enthusiastically co-signed.

We met Friday morning in FiDi and headed in to the Freedom Tower. Attendants scanned our pre-purchased tickets, we passed through security and waited in queue for the elevator. Once inside, it shot up 102 floors in seconds. Before we knew it, we were overlooking the greatest city in the world from the tallest building in the Western Hemisphere.

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After the breathtaking views, Quinn and I walked to the Seaport and grabbed that brunch at The Paris Café, one of the oldest watering holes in the city that claims both Thomas Edison and Teddy Roosevelt as past patrons. Afterwards, I sent her off to the hotel so she could catch an afternoon flight and I Uber-ed uptown so I could grab a quick 5.6 mile run in Central Park before my show.

On Saturday I added yet another new experience to my time in the city, and it is something I’ve wanted to do since I moved in to my apartment on the Upper West Side. According to Google, my place is 4.3 miles from Yankee Stadium. I always thought it would be cool to one day run to the Stadium and catch a 1 pm first pitch. So on Saturday morning I did just that, jogging up Manhattan, through Harlem and in to the Bronx, crossing the Macombs Dam Bridge before entering the ball park.

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Yankees lost to the Mariners and I hopped on the subway home. After an eventful past 48 hours, my plan was to settle in with a sandwich, a beer and my PlayStation 4.

And then my friend Shaina, who I first met covering red carpets here, shot me a text. She had a plus one for a TriBeCa Film Festival after-party. So instead of picking out a game to play on PS4 I picked out an outfit and headed downtown. The event was in celebration of “The Family Fang,” a movie that Jason Bateman both directed and starred in. His co-stars include Christopher Walken and Nicole Kidman.


I didn’t see the film but the party, sponsored by Hendrick’s Gin, was fantastic.

I’m pretty sure Sunday marked another first for me: the first time I spent an entire weekend at the Stadium. I rode the subway up and after the Yanks salvaged the final game of the series, I walked a mile across the bridge again before hopping on C, as to avoid the crowds at 161 and River.

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Before Sunday Funday ended I saw a few friends, racked up another 5.6 in the Park and caught the season finale of HBO’s “Vinyl.” We got another shout-out!

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All-in-all it was another weekend for the books. And to think, when I first made those plans on Friday I thought to myself, “Well, at least I’ll be leaving my neighborhood once this weekend.”

If you’re like me, you’re a faithful viewer of HBO’s Entourage. Season 6 of the Mark Wahlberg-produced show aired last Sunday. With the new season upon us, I figured what better time to catch up with a former character of the show – rapper Saigon.

The Brooklyn-native entered the show as an artist Turtle (Jerry Ferrara) wanted to manage. During the second and third seasons of Entourage, Saigon would play himself, and Turtle attempted to land him a record deal. Saigon eventually landed a deal, but with a different manager, cutting Turtle out of his career in the process.

Now three seasons later, Saigon seems a bit separated from the show. As of Monday, he hadn’t caught the premiere.

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In the interview, Saigon also speaks about a new LP dropping in September, and his current situation (or lackthereof) with Atlantic Records.


“I was in the studio man,” Saigon explaned. “One of the writers (Rob Weiss) called me asked me if I caught it to. They like to get my opinion on the show.”

Surely the show catapulted the rapper in to the mainstream – he even landed in an edition of Rolling Stone. Now after a dispute with Atlantic Records – allegedly over creative differences – the hip hop artist is preparing to drop a new album with Just Blaze – due out this September.

Saigon still keeps in touch with a number of people involved with the show, and planned on watching the latest episode soon – noting his girlfriend DVR’ed it for him.

the boys are back.

my life finds purpose again on september 7.