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John Mayer is on the road again, touring ahead of “The Search For Everything,” his new album that drops on April 14. But Mayer is once again in the headlines not as much for his music but rather a former relationship with pop star Katy Perry.

This shouldn’t come as too much of a surprise: yes, the “Love On The Weekend” singer is a notorious lady’s man and sure, he’s had a couple “foot-in-mouth” moments regarding women while speaking with the press over the years. But Mayer’s relationship with Perry, which lasted on-and-off for about a year-and-a-half, was different because it was both personal and professional.

Back in the summer of 2013, yours truly broke the news that Mayer and Perry recorded a song together. That track, “Who You Love” eventually served as a single off of the guitarist’s sixth studio album, “Paradise Valley.” Later that year, Perry told me that she worked on more than the song with Mayer.

“He played guitar actually on a couple of songs (on ‘PRISM’), which was awesome,” she revealed in the August 2013 phone interview. “He’s just been a great support, and that’s all you can ask (of your partner).”

So did the musical collaborations lead Mayer to forge deeper feelings for Perry? He certainly leaves it up for public discussion on the song, “Still Feel Like Your Man,” from “Search.”

“I still keep your shampoo in my shower, in case you wanna wash your hair,” Mayer croons on the track. “And I know that you probably found yourself someone, somewhere. But I do not really care.”

The list of people that he could be referring to is rather short, and by rather short, it’s pretty much exclusively Perry; this much Mayer confirmed in a recent interview with the New York Times.

“Who else would I be thinking about?” he told the Times. “And by the way, it’s a testament to the fact that I have not dated a lot of people in the last five, six years. That was my only relationship. So it’s like, give me this, people.”

And so as Mayer returns to the road, the iTunes chart and potentially the airwaves, he too may return to the world of celebrity. But he probably does not really care about that, either.

TV personality and restaurant-owner Guy Fieri is making headlines this week courtesy of a scathing review his new Times Square restaurant received from Pete Wells of the New York Times. Fieri has become a polarizing figure in the world of celebrity chefs: his shtick enjoyed by the masses while his credentials questioned by his critics.

Guy Fieri truly is the Nickelback of celebrity chefs.

The Canadian rockers have sold more than 50 million albums worldwide. In an age when music experts say “rock is dead,” Nickelback has charted nine songs in the top 20 on the Billboard Hot 100. The band is one of only a select few to have a “360 deal” with concert promoter Live Nation – the agreement is valued at an estimated $50-70 million.

Fieri’s career has skyrocketed since winning the second season of “The Next Food Network Star” in 2006. Shows like “Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives” and “Dinner: Impossible” have turned him in to a household name. The chef owns 11 restaurants, seven in California, and has even branched out in to other TV, hosting the now defunct “Minute to Win It” on NBC.

Yet, the harshest critics are quick to dismiss Nickelback as so produced and manufactured that its product doesn’t classify as “real rock.” Black Keys drummer Patrick Carney quipped to Rolling Stone, “Rock & roll is dying because people became OK with Nickelback being the biggest band in the world.”

Carney eventually issued a half-hearted apology… after all; he did criticize one of the biggest bands in the world.

And while Wells’ critique of Fieri, his use of adjectives, his “Donkey Sauce,” and his establishment was far beyond any condemnation you would expect from a single person, he is far from Fieri’s first detractor. Not only is Fieri known in some chef circles more for his TV antics then culinary skills, but other food critics have given similar feedback on the same restaurant, the two-month old, Guy’s American Kitchen and Bar. New York Post columnist Steve Cuozzo took to his column and said he “wouldn’t feed the mess to a cat.”

Both Fieri and Nickelback have managed to accumulate mass appeal despite their respective inner-circles deeming their work not just bad, but not worthy. I don’t wonder how it is possible, but I do think to myself: can people simply not tell the difference between good and bad, or do the “know-it-alls” know less than we think?

The New York Times’ reporter Dave Itzkoff broke the news earlier tonight that Lady GaGa’s manager (presumably Troy Carter) has flip-flopped on his initial decision to prohibit “Weird Al” Yankovic from releasing a parody GaGa’s hit, “Born This Way.” Despite first telling Yankovic that the denial came straight from the singer herself, GaGa’s manager now alleges that he never played the song for his artist. After hearing the parody, entitled “Perform This Way,” it’s said that GaGa is a fan and Yankovic will be able to release it commercially both as a single and on his album.

“Weird Al” will donate all proceeds from the single and music video to the Human Rights Campaign.

Download the interview

According to this article in The New York Times, the rules for what you can or cannot be fired for due to your Facebook page may be changing. Attorney Robin Bond, who specializes in labor law, explained on “The Ralphie Radio Show.”

Visit Robin’s site here.


If a group by the name of Jump Smokers didn’t do it, you know someone else would have released an anti-Chris Brown song. But, the Chicago-based duo is gaining world-notoriety for the track, “My Flow So Tight (Anti-Breezy)”.

“My flow so tight and the beat so sick, Chris Brown should get his ass kicked,” raps Jump Smokers front man C.W. Grizz on the hook.

The lead emcee called in to The Ralphie Radio Show last week to discuss the origin of the song and the response it’s received.

“It started out kinda as a joke,” revealed Grizz. “We wanted to make a song that legitimately would be poppin’ here in Chicago at the clubs.”

Jump Smokers first received airplay from a DJ in the Windy City, who spun the song on a live-to-air broadcast from a nightclub. Immediately, the radio station request lines lit up with listeners inquiring about the source of the track. Suddenly, night clubs and radio stations from coast to coast began playing the record, and news outlets from MTV to The New York Times covered the story of the song.

“Once I saw the pictures of Rihanna on TMZ.com… for me, I had it,” explained Grizz. “I kinda got fed up with a lot of celebrities not speaking out against him.”

Kanye West can be counted among the artists who didn’t speak against Brown – matter of fact – he even spoke in support of him. At a TV taping shortly after the pre-Grammy night incident, West asked a crowd to give the young R&B crooner a break. Other public figures – such as Oprah, Tyra Banks, and Perez Hilton – spoke out against the alleged abuse.

In an attempt not to gain any direct monetary success from the situation, Grizz noted that the group is donating proceeds of the song sales to charities that benefit women. However, this road proved rocky when a couple of non-for-profits were reluctant to accept the funds. Some were afraid that the song sent the wrong message to people – answering domestic violence with more abuse.

“I think (the charities) are taking it a little too seriously,” Grizz said in defense of his track. “We’re not threatening Chris Brown in this song. Hopefully the song makes you dance, laugh, and then think.”

At least two of the three reactions occurred over the weekend, when I spun the track inside Reflex at The Wilkes-Barre Hardware Bar Entertainment Complex. A couple club goers stopped and shot a perplexed look toward the DJ booth, while others “oohed” and most continued to dance.

And for those wondering, yes, Rihanna did hear the track. A DJ at a birthday party for Los Angeles Clipper Baron Davis spun the song with the Bajan-beauty present. No word on her reaction.

BRITNEY TOUR LIVES UP TO “CIRCUS” TITLE

Poor Britney Spears. If it isn’t Kevin Federline showing up backstage, it’s the Pussycat Dolls verbally clawing at each other on stage. If it isn’t a smoke-filled venue, it’s a fan jumping from the venue’s seating on stage.

Orlando, Florida resident Kyle King, 20, faces a single breach of peace charge for walking on stage during Spears’ encore performance of “Womanizer” at Mohegan Sun in Connecticut. He could face jail time.

Listen to Ralphie Aversa weekdays from 5-10p on 97 BHT.

Great read from The New York Times regarding celebrities personal/professional use of Twitter. Actually snagged the link from Ashton Kutcher’s Twitter update. Check it out here.