Archives For patrick stump

The “Boys Of Zummer” Tour starring Fall Out Boy, Wiz Khalifa and Hoodie Allen took over The Pavilion at Montage Mountain in Scranton, Pa. on Saturday. I was in attendance at the show, and here is what I noticed from my perspective.

– I attended the meet-and-greets for both Fall Out Boy and Wiz Khalifa, hopping between lines because both were off to a bit of a late start (I believe sound check ran late, thus pushing everything back). I just wanted to say a quick hello to the fellas of FOB; my presence was actually necessary at the Wiz meeting because his label required the radio station to have a representative on hand snapping photos.

– Although I don’t frequent them as much as I used to, I have attended my fair share of meet-and-greets. Fall Out Boy and Wiz Khalifa do a great job of making time to actually converse with each fan. It’s always nice to see artists that still don’t take such things as people wanting to meet them for granted.
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– Wiz was about a dressed down as you would expect when he strolled in to the tent we waited in backstage: flip flops, track pants and a green hoodie pulled up. His demeanor was pretty laid back, even when my camera stuttered before taking the first photo of our winners (thankfully I figured out the issue quickly. The photos are up now at 97bht.com).

– Fall Out Boy’s team runs its meet-and-greet a bit different. First, everybody is lined up just outside the venue’s entrance. A person from the band’s camp checks everyone in on a list one-by-one. Then we’re all lined up again, in the venue. From there, we proceeded to the VIP deck. A security guard stands by to hold any bags or phones; none were permitted as FOB has a staff photographer handle all photos. The shots are then uploaded to a website for download. They also offer props for the picture – sunglasses, boas, etc. Very photo booth-like.

– Of course, the guys from FOB are familiar faces now, especially lead singer Patrick Stump and bassist Pete Wentz. All or part of the band has been on “Ralphie Tonight” four times in the past nine months. We exchanged quick salutations and I told them how excited I was to hear the newer stuff live.
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– I also had a chance to chop it up backstage with DJ Bonics, a radio personality who is also Khalifa’s tour DJ. He was telling me how well the tour has gone for Wiz. Some still don’t understand how the two-acts can co-exist on the same bill. After seeing the Pittsburgh-emcee’s set, which included all of Wiz’s hits from “Black and Yellow” to “Young, Wild and Free” and of course “See You Again,” it became much easier to understand. The crowd was engaged from start to finish, and if they didn’t initially show up to see Khalifa, they more-than-likely left the venue a fan.

– And Fall Out Boy gets better every time I see them live; the last prior to this being on the 2013 “Save Rock and Roll” arena tour. It’s a seamless string of hit-after-hit with some fan favorites sprinkled in. As expected, a highlight of the evening was the band playing “Fourth of July,” a track from “American Beauty/American Psycho,” on of course July 4th.

The second day of Red Carpet Radio at the 2015 Billboard Music Awards was hectic, as many BBMA finalists, presenters and performers stopped by to chat with “Ralphie Tonight.” Check out some of the photos and conversations below with Hozier, Tori Kelly, Fall Out Boy and more.
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Special thanks to BBMA co-host Ludacris, who also made some time for the show. We chatted with him while he waited for a car to pick him up… in the back of the MGM Grand Arena… on a curb. In Vegas, there is a first time for everything.





It’s been two years since Fall Out Boy announced that the band was getting back together after a multi-year hiatus. Since February of 2013 the band has released two number one albums and toured theaters, arenas, and outdoor amphitheaters.

And according to the guys, they’ve also learned a thing or two about each other.

“I think we learned how to be patient with each other, and how to trust each other,” lead singer Patrick Stump stated on “Ralphie Tonight” before recalling something bassist Pete Wentz told him after the band reunited. “I asked him, because we’ve always kind of felt like Pete leads the band in a lot of ways, I was like, ‘How did you get better at it because we used to argue about things and now we don’t so much?’”

Wentz’s response, as recalled by Stump, left an impression on the front man.

“He’s like, ‘I learned not to talk sometimes, because when you don’t talk, often times somebody else in the room is already going to say the thing you were thinking. You let everybody express themselves, and you learn things that you wouldn’t have said. You hear more voices than just your own.”

Stump said the band listens to each other more, and perhaps that is one of the reasons why the Chicago-born quartet is bigger than ever. The band’s sixth studio LP, American Beauty/American Psycho, debuted this week atop the Billboard 200 – FOB’s third number one album. The release is buoyed by the tracks “Centuries” and the dance party-friendly, “Uma Thurman,” for which the actress granted the band permission to use her name.

“The whole song was an elaborate ruse to get (Thurman’s) phone number,” joked Stump. “It’s 1-2-3-4-5-6-7,” guitarist Joe Trohman quickly added. Wentz said it was a case of their people reaching out to her people, and she gave them the green light. The bassist also noted that he isn’t sure if Thurman even heard the track.

Although “Centuries” is still gaining airplay on pop radio, “Uma” may not be far behind, meaning Ms. Thurman may soon find the song inescapable.

Don’t call it a comeback. No, really. Fall Out Boy insists, the band never broke-up, but rather took a hiatus that officially ceased on Monday.

“When we were kids the only thing that got us through most days was music. It’s why we started Fall Out Boy in the first place,” the band wrote on its official website. “We needed to plug back in and make some music that matters to us.”

With that, the Chicago-rockers promised to “save rock and roll…” with the release of its fifth full-length studio album. Save Rock and Roll will be released worldwide on May 6 and 7. The lead single, an up-tempo sing-a-long called “My Songs Know What You Did in the Dark (Light Em Up)” is on iTunes now.

In addition to the new music, FOB returns to the road with a 33-date trek across North America that kicks off May 14 in Milwaukee, WI. The band plays intimate one-night-only shows this week in Chicago, New York, and Los Angeles.

I stopped by WBRE’s “PA Live!” for my weekly segment, “The Ralphie Report.” This week, I talked about his interviews with The Fray’s Isaac Slade and Fall Out Boy front man Patrick Stump, who just released his solo album, ‘Soul Punk.’ I also talked about my interview last year with former “Hannah Montana” star Mitchel Musso. The actor was picked up last weekend in Burbank, CA on suspicion of DUI.

I appear every Thursday on “PA Live!” – a new, daily show on WBRE that airs weekdays at 4 p.m. The show is co-hosted by Dave Kuharchik and Monica Madeja.

Wynter Gordon’s introduction as a new artist wasn’t typical for the industry. But, when you’re working with Flo Rida on what would eventually be a top five hit in the country, untypical is par for the course.

“The good ole’ days!” exclaimed Wynter, born Diana Gordon, when I brought up the 2009 track “Sugar” during an interview on “The Ralphie Radio Show.” “That was like the first time that I traveled the world in style, because Flo Rida surely does travel in style.”

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The best hotels, with the best accommodations, and some prime time gigs like “Jimmy Kimmel Live!” were a small sample of the perks that the singer/songwriter experienced with Flo. But now Gordon is out on her own, making a name for herself.

Wynter just wrapped up a tour in support of Fall Out Boy front man Patrick Stump. I ran in to her backstage during their stop in Philadelphia at World Live Café. Gordon was a bit frazzled. It was just minutes before she was supposed to go on stage and she needed to iron a skirt. The problem: Wynter thought she didn’t have any water for the iron in her dressing room. Quickly I ran to the bar, grabbed two cups and sprinted back to her. Turns out, while my efforts were appreciated, they weren’t needed.

“There was a bathroom right in the room,” Gordon admitted. “I didn’t even know.”

Surely, clothing irons and water were not an issue with Flo Rida’s hospitality rider. But, now that Gordon is flying solo, she can truly live out her dream of making music for the masses. Her first single, “Dirty Talk,” burned up DJ crates across the world and sold over three million copies. Wynter released the With the Music I Die EP in June. The extended play, which has already spawned a top three dance charter in “Til Death,” also features her next single, “Buy My Love.” The track fuses a retro 90’s pop sound with current dance beats, provided by Swedish House Mafia’s Axwell.

“I was doing a bunch of serious songs (for the EP),” explained Gordon. “’Buy My Love’ was one of the more fun, cheekier ones. I’m kind of leaning more towards that sound, moving forward.”

Certainly dance music is seeing quite the resurgence, led by big time DJs and producers like the aforementioned SHM along with David Guetta, Afrojack, The Cataracs, and others. But Gordon believes that like any other genre or group of artists, a lack of evolution could lead to audiences becoming bored and moving away from the product.

“Nothing can stay the same and be popular for a long, long, long period of time,” Gordon said. “I don’t think we can all do the same thing for too long.”

What timing! The week Patrick Stump joins “The Ralphie Radio Show” to chat about his new album Soul Punk, the first single is featured as the iTunes Song of the Week. This means you can download the “This City” (Remix) with Lupe Fiasco for free!

Check out the clip below of Stump chatting about how his fellow Chicagoian was selected to guest on the song.

Fall Out Boy lead singer Patrick Stump has a number of different feelings about his debut solo album, Soul Punk. You could count “lucky” as one of them, as in, lucky he isn’t in the limelight as much as his band mate Pete Wentz.

“(Pete) was under the microscope. I’m a tiny bit, but nothing like he has to deal with,” Stump said recently in a sit down interview with “The Ralphie Radio Show.” “I think it’s a lot harder for him to make the Black Cards record because from the get-go, not only are expectations wildly out of control, but people’s perspectives on his intentions are wildly out of wack.”

If you’re wondering – all four members of FOB have moved on from the band to other projects – but Stump doesn’t believe that his solo album, nor any other activities, signal the demise of the Chicago pop-punk group.

“Fall Out Boy has a lot of fans. They’re still really dedicated. And (Soul Punk) clearly isn’t Fall Out Boy,” Stump attempted to clarify. “That’s been the hardest thing: getting people comfortable with the idea that I’m just doing this thing on the side, and if this thing takes off, then it’s still considered something parallel to Fall Out Boy.”

But even Stump admits that while his intentions are clearly stated, everything is “all talk” until he releases his album and FOB drops a new LP. For now, all he can do is promote Soul Punk, which he finished about two months ago, and comes out October 18. The first single is actually a remix of a cut from the disc: “This City” featuring fellow Chicago native Lupe Fiasco. The idea of a remix came from Stump’s label, Island Records.

“Eric Wang is a friend of mine, and he works at the label, and he gave me his list and he was like, ‘Give me your list,’ recalled Stump of trying to decide who would be asked to contribute a verse to the remix. “The top of both of our lists was Lupe.”

Truth be told, Stump’s entire list was essentially Fiasco, and that’s it. The vocalist admires the emcee, calling him a “superhero.”

“There’s not a lot of people that have an authoritative intelligence but also a ‘fun’ to them,” he explained. “There are a lot of rappers who are really smart and really intellectual, and Lupe fits that bill, but he also knows his way around a pop song.”

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Stump cited Fiasco’s “The Show Goes On” as a prime example of this, as the singer said he had never heard a pop song in heavy radio rotation deliver some of the points that Lupe made in the track.

Still, while Stump would be happy with big spins and sales numbers, those are far from his motivating factors for releasing the album.

“When I was doing this record I was thinking about mortality,” he revealed. “Someday I will either be dead or I will be someone’s grandpa and it would be nice to have something, ‘When I was younger, I did this thing.’”

Although, by then who knows if that generation will be able to recognize the now 27 year-old. Stump is almost unrecognizable now – as he lost a considerable amount of weight since Fall Out Boy’s last go-around.

“I have a lot more energy,” said Stump of how the weight loss has affected his performance. “I fret to call it dancing, because I don’t think I’m all that great a dancer, but I do, sort of get to dance.”

The Fall Out Boy front man and the rapper pay homage to their hometown of Chicago in the first single from Stump’s forthcoming LP, Soul Punk.

This is the whole reason why “YouTube Tuesday” was created in the first place – to showcase cool videos with great audio that are on YouTube but that you may not be aware of.

Daryl Hall – one half of the legendary Hall & Oates, invites famous musicians over to his house for jam sessions, which he professionally films and uploads to his website and YouTube. Some of the more interesting collaborations include…

Kevin Rudolf

Train

and Fall Out Boy’s Patrick Stump